A harmonica playing cab driver on State Street, 1979, Chicago.

A harmonica playing cab driver on State Street, 1979, Chicago.

Dancing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go, Rush and Chestnut, 1964, Chicago.

via the fantastic blog: taylorandracine.wordpress.com

Dancing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go, Rush and Chestnut, 1964, Chicago.

via the fantastic blog: taylorandracine.wordpress.com

Blind musicians busk in the city, 1950, Chicago. Art Shay

Blind musicians busk in the city, 1950, Chicago. Art Shay

South side juke joint, 1941, Chicago. Russell Lee

I’m loving the drummer…

South side juke joint, 1941, Chicago. Russell Lee

I’m loving the drummer…

A blind musician on Michigan Ave, 1930, Chicago. Jun Fujita

A blind musician on Michigan Ave, 1930, Chicago. Jun Fujita

N Alta Vista Terrace, 1907, Chicago.

Bounded by Seminary, Grace, Kenmore and Byron, this one block street was developed in 1904 to resemble London row houses. Now listed on the US National Register of Historic Places, this area of 40 homes has remained relatively untouched by urban renewal.

Lake Shore Drive, north from Huron, 1911, Chicago

Looking east on Division from State, 1911, Chicago

Harvard, north from 74th, 1910, Chicago.

Langley, north from 44th Street, 1905, Chicago.

1) Looking north on Michigan to Randolph, 1955, Chicago
2) Looking south on Michigan to Wacker, 1955, Chicago

State and Madison, 1941, Chicago. John Vachon

State and Madison, 1941, Chicago. John Vachon

Looking east from the Wells St. Bridge, 1932, Chicago

Update: Thanks to everybodywrites for pointing out why a 1930s photographic perspective is different from today’s (google view) perspective:

"…the telephotographic magnification level from the first photo is greater than second (compare the relative sizes of the capitols atop bridge anchors for the next street [Lasalle?]). Not only is the built environment more dense in the present day, but we can see more of it. Comparing the absolute amount of change that took place between these two photographs is difficult. You can see the Carbide and Carbon Building in both photos. The first photo has it looming large enough in the back row. The second photo has it as a sliver where the perspective line created by the right bank of the river meets a kind of wall of buildings at the bend in the river."

Broadway, Clark and Diversey, 1925, Chicago.

Broadway, Clark and Diversey, 1925, Chicago.

Looking east over the Chicago Ave Bridge, 1914, Chicago.