Posts tagged 1870's

Goll’s Drugstore, Canal and 12th (Roosevelt), 1870, Chicago.

The arrow points to a fire alarm box that a neighbor of the O’Leary’s attempted to use to notify the CFD in the moments immediately after their barn went ablaze. The owner of the drugstore refused to unlock the box stating that he had already seen a response team headed in the direction of the flames. As a result, it would be an hour before anyone was notified of what was happening…

Goll’s Drugstore, Canal and 12th (Roosevelt), 1870, Chicago.

The arrow points to a fire alarm box that a neighbor of the O’Leary’s attempted to use to notify the CFD in the moments immediately after their barn went ablaze. The owner of the drugstore refused to unlock the box stating that he had already seen a response team headed in the direction of the flames. As a result, it would be an hour before anyone was notified of what was happening…

Looking east from the north west side entry point of the Washington Street Tunnel, 1878, Chicago. 

Residents of Wicker Park would have traveled by horse-drawn streetcar or carriage, down Milwaukee Ave, to this point to enter the downtown area.

Looking east from the north west side entry point of the Washington Street Tunnel, 1878, Chicago.

Residents of Wicker Park would have traveled by horse-drawn streetcar or carriage, down Milwaukee Ave, to this point to enter the downtown area.

Construction is completed on the Interstate Exposition Building, Michigan and Adams, 1872, Chicago.

The IEB would be demolished in 1892 to make way for Art Institute, which was completed in 1893.

I often mention that this is one of the “lost” buildings of Chicago which I would most like to visit.

Construction is completed on the Interstate Exposition Building, Michigan and Adams, 1872, Chicago.

The IEB would be demolished in 1892 to make way for Art Institute, which was completed in 1893.

I often mention that this is one of the “lost” buildings of Chicago which I would most like to visit.

Smoldering coal embers burn on the north side of the Chicago River’s east branch in the days after the Great Fire, 1871, Chicago.

Smoldering coal embers burn on the north side of the Chicago River’s east branch in the days after the Great Fire, 1871, Chicago.

Before and after photos of the Great Fire, looking south on Wabash from Jackson, 1871, Chicago.

Before and after photos of the Great Fire, looking south on Wabash from Jackson, 1871, Chicago.

At the Crib, 1875, Chicago.

At the Crib, 1875, Chicago.

Cranky Ann, The Street Walker; A Story of Chicago in Chunks, 1878, Chicago. Shang Andrews

Among the gems found in this novel of Chicago crime and vice:

' “My God!” exclaimed Mr. Baldwin, “is it possible that such a black spot (brothel) can be found in the very heart of the great city of Chicago - a christian city, too!” '

' “Woman, Mr. Baldwin, can descend to far lower depths or infamy than man! The very worst devils in the world are she-devils, and if there is a hell, as true as I stand here I believe it is governed by a woman!” ‘

via Newberry Digital Archives

Old Cook County Hospital, Harrison and Wood Streets, 1877, Chicago.

Old Cook County Hospital, Harrison and Wood Streets, 1877, Chicago.

Dearborn and Madison (with the skeleton of the Chicago Tribune ) 1871, Chicago.
If you’re looking for Carl, he’s gone where the woodbine twineth.
Update: Thanks to johnnypayphone.tumblr.com for noting that “where the woodbine twineth” was a euphemism used at the time to designate one “going to the bathroom” as woodbine was often planted along outhouses to mask the smell. A quick google search finds a lot of references to the once popular saying, which could also mean “being buried in a graveyard” or “lost.” There was also an episode of the Alfred Hitchcock Hour named as such.

Dearborn and Madison (with the skeleton of the Chicago Tribune ) 1871, Chicago.

If you’re looking for Carl, he’s gone where the woodbine twineth.

Update: Thanks to johnnypayphone.tumblr.com for noting that “where the woodbine twineth” was a euphemism used at the time to designate one “going to the bathroom” as woodbine was often planted along outhouses to mask the smell. A quick google search finds a lot of references to the once popular saying, which could also mean “being buried in a graveyard” or “lost.” There was also an episode of the Alfred Hitchcock Hour named as such.

Dearborn and Madison, 1870, Chicago

Dearborn and Madison, 1870, Chicago

The Lake Street Bridge swung open to allow river traffic to pass, 1875, Chicago.

The Lake Street Bridge swung open to allow river traffic to pass, 1875, Chicago.

The Washington Street Tunnel, looking west from Franklin Street, 1870, Chicago.

The Washington Street Tunnel, looking west from Franklin Street, 1870, Chicago.

The Delaware Building, 36 W Randolph, 1900, Chicago.
Built in 1872, the (often referenced here) Italianate building still stands.

The Delaware Building, 36 W Randolph, 1900, Chicago.

Built in 1872, the (often referenced here) Italianate building still stands.

A horse drawn trolley from the 1870s is recreated in 1925.
This particular line would have carried passengers between Irving Park and Monroe.

A horse drawn trolley from the 1870s is recreated in 1925.

This particular line would have carried passengers between Irving Park and Monroe.

The Honore Block, SW corner of Dearborn and Monroe, 1871, Chicago.

The Honore Block, SW corner of Dearborn and Monroe, 1871, Chicago.