Posts tagged Stockyards

A postcard from 1904 features a not-so-subtle poem referencing the newness of the city, Chicagoans’ propensity for exaggeration, our ability to make a buck and a slight dig about our women.

A postcard from 1904 features a not-so-subtle poem referencing the newness of the city, Chicagoans’ propensity for exaggeration, our ability to make a buck and a slight dig about our women.

Grand opening of the Vienna Sausage Co. (now known as Vienna Beef) 415-417 S Halsted (street number changed later to 1215-1217 S Halsted), 1894, Chicago.

via Vienna Beef archives.

Grand opening of the Vienna Sausage Co. (now known as Vienna Beef) 415-417 S Halsted (street number changed later to 1215-1217 S Halsted), 1894, Chicago.

via Vienna Beef archives.

The “slip”, running along Pershing from Racine to Halsted, 1924, Chicago. 

This is the wasteland created where the runoff from the Stockyards connected to the river - and at one time was technically known as the eastern fork of the south branch of the Chicago River.

The “slip”, running along Pershing from Racine to Halsted, 1924, Chicago.

This is the wasteland created where the runoff from the Stockyards connected to the river - and at one time was technically known as the eastern fork of the south branch of the Chicago River.

Armour’s Star, “The Ham What Am” advertisement, featuring images of the Stockyards, 1930, Chicago.

Armour’s Star, “The Ham What Am” advertisement, featuring images of the Stockyards, 1930, Chicago.

Mmmmmmm….canned hamburgers from Swift!, 1950, Chicago.

Mmmmmmm….canned hamburgers from Swift!, 1950, Chicago.

French advertisement poster for Armour’s Beef Extract from Chicago, 1893.

French advertisement poster for Armour’s Beef Extract from Chicago, 1893.

The sad case of the bull who bolted from the Hygrade Packing Plant at the Stockyards when he realized his fate, 1956, Chicago.

Many of the packing plants were located on multiple levels, so it wasn’t uncommon for animals to fall from upper stories when trying to escape.

This guy was shot on the fire escape to end his misery.

The sad case of the bull who bolted from the Hygrade Packing Plant at the Stockyards when he realized his fate, 1956, Chicago.

Many of the packing plants were located on multiple levels, so it wasn’t uncommon for animals to fall from upper stories when trying to escape.

This guy was shot on the fire escape to end his misery.

Stockyard butchers, 1895, Chicago

Stockyard butchers, 1895, Chicago

The rather inhumane practice of “knocking,” which would stun the animal before slaughter, Union Stockyards 1906, Chicago

The rather inhumane practice of “knocking,” which would stun the animal before slaughter, Union Stockyards 1906, Chicago

Moving to Slaughter, Union Stockyards, 1946, Chicago. Tom Lea

Moving to Slaughter, Union Stockyards, 1946, Chicago. Tom Lea

Stockyards, 1930, Chicago. Margaret Bourke-White

Stockyards, 1930, Chicago. Margaret Bourke-White

Patrick “Packy” “Pride of the Stockyards” McFarland, 1888-1936, Chicago.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packey_McFarland

Don’t call them hot dogs.

Armour Plant, Stockyards, 1938, Chicago. Margaret Bourke-White.

The second picture shows a worker stuffing beef bladders.

Stockyards, c.1950’s, Chicago. Art Shay
Art Shay’s notes on this photo: “A Sunday supplement, This Week, with a circulation of many millions, asked me to illustrate their story of the crowded, abusive way Midwestern animals were packed on their way to slaughter in the historic Chicago Stockyards - the classic “Jungle” killing ground of yore. The baby Spotted Poland had futilely tried to get milk from his dead mother, then feebly worked his thirsty way down the teats of other dead, pregnant sows who had also been crushed in transit. The little guy, I learned, died of thirst two days later. Our story helped get the Department of Agriculture off its FEMA-like ass and shipping procedures improved. Despite this amelioration, The Stockyards were gradually done in …”
from Chicago’s Nelson Algren, by Art Shay

Stockyards, c.1950’s, Chicago. Art Shay

Art Shay’s notes on this photo: “A Sunday supplement, This Week, with a circulation of many millions, asked me to illustrate their story of the crowded, abusive way Midwestern animals were packed on their way to slaughter in the historic Chicago Stockyards - the classic “Jungle” killing ground of yore. The baby Spotted Poland had futilely tried to get milk from his dead mother, then feebly worked his thirsty way down the teats of other dead, pregnant sows who had also been crushed in transit. The little guy, I learned, died of thirst two days later. Our story helped get the Department of Agriculture off its FEMA-like ass and shipping procedures improved. Despite this amelioration, The Stockyards were gradually done in …”

from Chicago’s Nelson Algren, by Art Shay

Rooftop capture of a steer which had escaped the slaughterhouse on the second level of a meat packing plant near the Stockyards, 1964, Chicago.

Rooftop capture of a steer which had escaped the slaughterhouse on the second level of a meat packing plant near the Stockyards, 1964, Chicago.