Posts tagged television

Mulqueen’s Kiddie-A-Go-Go, a pint-sized American Banstand-esque dance party which aired on WCIU from 1963-1970, featuring the adult host, Pandora.
Check out a couple of trippy video clips here: http://chicagoradioandmedia.com/news/151-mulqueens-kiddie-a-go-go-1966

Mulqueen’s Kiddie-A-Go-Go, a pint-sized American Banstand-esque dance party which aired on WCIU from 1963-1970, featuring the adult host, Pandora.

Check out a couple of trippy video clips here: http://chicagoradioandmedia.com/news/151-mulqueens-kiddie-a-go-go-1966

Rainn Wilson, who plays Dwight Schrute on The Office, graduated from New Trier High School in 1985.
Catch the final series episode of The Office next Thursday.

Rainn Wilson, who plays Dwight Schrute on The Office, graduated from New Trier High School in 1985.

Catch the final series episode of The Office next Thursday.

Building circuit boards at the Admiral Television Company, 1954, Chicago.

Building circuit boards at the Admiral Television Company, 1954, Chicago.

A city taxi outfitted with a TV by the Chicago based Admiral Television Co., 1956, Chicago.

A city taxi outfitted with a TV by the Chicago based Admiral Television Co., 1956, Chicago.

In 1951, 300 families in Lakeview and Lincoln Park were picked to be test households for a new pay service called Phonevision, a precursor to cable television.
Televisions were equipped with a box which would descramble transmissions when a show was ordered by phone. The cost was (a then expensive) $1 per view and there were only three movies to choose from.
Ultimately it failed and subscription television did not return to Chicago until 1983, with Telefirst, an early prototype to modern cable television.
Read more here: http://www.earlytelevision.org/phonevision.html

In 1951, 300 families in Lakeview and Lincoln Park were picked to be test households for a new pay service called Phonevision, a precursor to cable television.

Televisions were equipped with a box which would descramble transmissions when a show was ordered by phone. The cost was (a then expensive) $1 per view and there were only three movies to choose from.

Ultimately it failed and subscription television did not return to Chicago until 1983, with Telefirst, an early prototype to modern cable television.

Read more here: http://www.earlytelevision.org/phonevision.html

A steeplejack climbs a newly installed television transmission tower to place a …pickle… on top, 1949. Francis Miller

Not sure of the significance of the pickle. This was most likely on top of the Tribune Tower. Any ideas?

Flash Cabs install televisions in their taxis, 1963, Chicago.

Flash Cabs install televisions in their taxis, 1963, Chicago.

One of the first televised Blackhawks games, 1947, Chicago. Wallace Kirkland.
Doesn’t seem like winter without hockey…

One of the first televised Blackhawks games, 1947, Chicago. Wallace Kirkland.

Doesn’t seem like winter without hockey…

Chicago’s most famous clown, Bozo, who was portrayed by Bob Bell on WGN for decades.
Most people don’t realize that Bozo was actually a franchise, portrayed in multiple cities and countries by different actors. However, due to syndication, Bell’s Bozo was by far the most successful and well known.

Chicago’s most famous clown, Bozo, who was portrayed by Bob Bell on WGN for decades.

Most people don’t realize that Bozo was actually a franchise, portrayed in multiple cities and countries by different actors. However, due to syndication, Bell’s Bozo was by far the most successful and well known.

Television “screenshot” from 1947. WBKB was Chicago’s one and only television station then, eventually becoming WLS-TV, ABC 7.

Television “screenshot” from 1947. WBKB was Chicago’s one and only television station then, eventually becoming WLS-TV, ABC 7.

At the Home Furnishings Market of 1961 in Chicago, a prototype was introduced predicting a flat-screen television (4 inches thick!) and a device that allowed you to record a show for a later playback…

At the Home Furnishings Market of 1961 in Chicago, a prototype was introduced predicting a flat-screen television (4 inches thick!) and a device that allowed you to record a show for a later playback…

Long before televisions were mass produced for the home, an exhibit at the Century of Progress World’s Fair of 1933 demonstrated how televisions would be used as videophones. This photo was obviously doctored to show a clear screen image, however the actual device worked. It’s amazing that it took as long for the  internet and computers to make this a commonplace reality.

Long before televisions were mass produced for the home, an exhibit at the Century of Progress World’s Fair of 1933 demonstrated how televisions would be used as videophones. This photo was obviously doctored to show a clear screen image, however the actual device worked. It’s amazing that it took as long for the  internet and computers to make this a commonplace reality.