Posts tagged women's rights

The Chicago Women’s Liberation Rock Band, 1972, Chicago. Naomi Weisstein

Thanks to paupauuux.tumblr.com for this link to more about the band:

http://www.uic.edu/orgs/cwluherstory/CWLUAbout/rock.html

The Chicago Women’s Liberation Rock Band, 1972, Chicago. Naomi Weisstein

Thanks to paupauuux.tumblr.com for this link to more about the band:

http://www.uic.edu/orgs/cwluherstory/CWLUAbout/rock.html

A group of Women’s Liberation activists remove their bras in front of the Wrigley Building, 1969, Chicago.
The women then threw their bras in the river as a symbol of freedom, where upon they were swiftly issued citations for polluting the river. 

A group of Women’s Liberation activists remove their bras in front of the Wrigley Building, 1969, Chicago.

The women then threw their bras in the river as a symbol of freedom, where upon they were swiftly issued citations for polluting the river. 

Evelyn “Jackie” Bross and Catherine Barscz at the Racine Ave police station, 1943, Chicago.
From the Chicago History Museum:
Evelyn “Jackie” Bross (left) and Catherine Barscz (right) at the Racine Avenue Police Station, Chicago, June 5, 1943
In 1943 Evelyn “Jackie” Bross of Cherokee heritage, was arrested on her way home from work for violating Chicago’s cross-dressing and public indecency ordinance. Bross, who was 19 at the time, and a machinist at a WWII defense plant, wore men’s clothes and sported a man’s hair cut – that was more than enough for the Chicago police. Chicago possessed an ordinance outlawing cross-dressing as early as 1851. 
For the bulk of the city’s history cross-dressing was a type of indecent exposure.  The ordinance decrees that “If any person shall appear in a public place…in a dress not belonging to his or her sex…. He or she shall be subject to a fine of not less than twenty dollars nor more than one hundred dollars for each offense”.
When Bross appeared in court, Chicago was captivated by the story. In court, Bross reportedly informed the judge that she chose to wear men’s clothing because it was “more comfortable than women’s clothes and handy for work.” She openly declared, “I wish I was a boy. I never did anything wrong. I just like to wear men’s clothes… [but] everyone knows I’m a woman.”
In the end, Bross was ordered to see a court psychiatrist for six months and Chicago’s cross-dressing code was revised. As of 1943, the code allowed for individuals to wear clothing of the opposite sex, provided it was not worn “with the intent to conceal his or her sex.” Arrests continued in spite of the alteration and the Chicago code regarding cross-dressing would not be eliminated until 1978.

Evelyn “Jackie” Bross and Catherine Barscz at the Racine Ave police station, 1943, Chicago.

From the Chicago History Museum:

Evelyn “Jackie” Bross (left) and Catherine Barscz (right) at the Racine Avenue Police Station, Chicago, June 5, 1943

In 1943 Evelyn “Jackie” Bross of Cherokee heritage, was arrested on her way home from work for violating Chicago’s cross-dressing and public indecency ordinance. Bross, who was 19 at the time, and a machinist at a WWII defense plant, wore men’s clothes and sported a man’s hair cut – that was more than enough for the Chicago police. Chicago possessed an ordinance outlawing cross-dressing as early as 1851.

For the bulk of the city’s history cross-dressing was a type of indecent exposure.  The ordinance decrees that “If any person shall appear in a public place…in a dress not belonging to his or her sex…. He or she shall be subject to a fine of not less than twenty dollars nor more than one hundred dollars for each offense”.

When Bross appeared in court, Chicago was captivated by the story. In court, Bross reportedly informed the judge that she chose to wear men’s clothing because it was “more comfortable than women’s clothes and handy for work.” She openly declared, “I wish I was a boy. I never did anything wrong. I just like to wear men’s clothes… [but] everyone knows I’m a woman.”

In the end, Bross was ordered to see a court psychiatrist for six months and Chicago’s cross-dressing code was revised. As of 1943, the code allowed for individuals to wear clothing of the opposite sex, provided it was not worn “with the intent to conceal his or her sex.” Arrests continued in spite of the alteration and the Chicago code regarding cross-dressing would not be eliminated until 1978.

One of the city’s first 3, female cab drivers, c.1926, Chicago. Known as taxiflappers, the women had to have “driving skills, good looks” as well as five years experience. The company had plans to hire 200 women to drive their fleet.
For some reason, on the odd chance that I get a female driver here in the city, I always feel safer. And they’re usually a little salty, which proves for a fun ride…

One of the city’s first 3, female cab drivers, c.1926, Chicago. Known as taxiflappers, the women had to have “driving skills, good looks” as well as five years experience. The company had plans to hire 200 women to drive their fleet.

For some reason, on the odd chance that I get a female driver here in the city, I always feel safer. And they’re usually a little salty, which proves for a fun ride…

Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman, c. 1922. The world’s first person of African descent to hold an international aviation license as well as the United States’ first African American female aviator. And…..she was from Chicago!

You have to read her story: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bessie_Coleman. There needs to be a movie made about her life, ASAP. She was a bad-ass!

The city honored Queen Bess in 1990 by renaming old Mannheim Road to Bessie Coleman Drive…the address of O’Hare Airport!

A woman dressed as a suffragette for a costume party in Chicago, c.1915. She’s actually mocking the movement, as the sign she’s wearing says, “We don’t know what we want, but we mean to have it.” Sounds like the opponents to the Occupy Movement, doesn’t it? The more things change…

A woman dressed as a suffragette for a costume party in Chicago, c.1915. She’s actually mocking the movement, as the sign she’s wearing says, “We don’t know what we want, but we mean to have it.” Sounds like the opponents to the Occupy Movement, doesn’t it? The more things change…

Dorothy Hunt and Dr. Mary Walker, c.1912, Chicago. Dr. Walker wore men’s clothing in support for the suffragist movement.

Dorothy Hunt and Dr. Mary Walker, c.1912, Chicago. Dr. Walker wore men’s clothing in support for the suffragist movement.

chicagohistorymuseum:

Small numbers of women joined the police ranks in the 1920s. Shown here is Chicago policewoman Anna Sheridan, with pistol, in 1928.
Want a copy of this photo?  > Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: DN-0084697.
Want to buy a book?> Purchase Historic Photos of Chicago Crime: The Capone Era

chicagohistorymuseum:

Small numbers of women joined the police ranks in the 1920s. Shown here is Chicago policewoman Anna Sheridan, with pistol, in 1928.

Want a copy of this photo?  
> Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: DN-0084697.

Want to buy a book?
> Purchase Historic Photos of Chicago Crime: The Capone Era